What Is Moore’s Law?

fakescience:

What Is Moore's Law?

accurate

theatlanticvideo:

Alan Turing, considered the founding father of computer science, conceived of the Turing machine to illustrate mechanical computation in 1936. Jeroen van den Bos and Davy Landman at Amsterdam’s Centrum Wiskunde & Informatica set out to honor Turing’s legacy by recreating his calculating machine with LEGOs.

Video by Andre Theelen. Via Vimeo Staff Picks

(via microlina)

prostheticknowledge:

Look back in Ascii: Computing in the 1980s

Another article, part of Retro Week, from British tech site Reg Hardware, looks at the computers of the 1980s:

When I landed the job of Doctor Who Script Editor in 1981, I knew I needed a computer. Actually it was something I’d known since the age of 12, but back then you couldn’t get started for less than half a million dollars. Now you could pick up a Sinclair ZX81 for a shade under fifty quid in kit form. But if you wanted a serious computer for writing - and I did - you needed much deeper pockets. 

The IBM PC was launched in the UK that summer for a little over £2000, and shortly before Christmas the £235 BBC Micro arrived.

In fact, a number of usable machines had been coming onto the market since the late 1970s: for around £600 you could get the butt-ugly Commodore PET, and if you had around twice that to spare there was, of course, the Apple II — although lower case characters on the screen would cost you extra for a much coveted hardware plug-in called “Dan Paymer’s Lower Case Adapter”.

At one point I had my heart set on the Exidy Sorcerer. I liked its standardisation: it was built around the S100 bus and the Z80 processor and ran the CP/M operating system. Unfortunately it went out of production around this time.

Meanwhile, my desk was piling up with submissions from would-be Doctor Who writers. One of these was a computer buff. Andrew Stevenson’s stories never made it to the screen, but he steered me in the direction of a company up in Nottingham that was importing an affordable dual-floppy CP/M machine direct from America, the Vector Graphic System B. I got to try it by promising to review it for a popular computing magazine of the time, Practical Computing.

You can read the rest of the article here

(via )

emmanuelnegro:

Car plate: you’re doing it right.
(for those not that much into cars, that’s a mothafucking Tesla Roadster and yes, it’s an electric beauty)

emmanuelnegro:

Car plate: you’re doing it right.

(for those not that much into cars, that’s a mothafucking Tesla Roadster and yes, it’s an electric beauty)

(via mutualassureddistraction)